62 BOOK Atomic Habits (2018)

January 23, 2024

James Clear (Estados Unidos)

«All big things come from small beginnings».

This is my third time reading this book, and I find it valuable. I decided to revisit it so my favourite human, who also read it, and I could share our reflections and commitments to applying what we’ve learned. Being such a great book, I believe that if we apply even 1% of what it says, it will have been worth reading (with this comment, I’m putting all the pressure on my human to apply it, hehe).

This is an excellent introductory book to delve into the world of habits. It’s a super easy read in English and Spanish, but most importantly, it provides many applicable resources.

James Clear’s “Atomic Habits” delves into the idea that small changes can significantly impact our lives. Clear breakdown habits into smaller units called “atomic habits” and argues that we can achieve significant long-term changes by focusing on minimal but consistent adjustments.

The book explores how habits are formed through a cycle of cues that trigger a response and a reward. Clear details this cycle and offers strategies to identify and modify each stage, allowing readers to understand how to change ingrained habits and establish new ones effectively. This understanding of habits is fascinating as it applies to both positive and negative aspects of our lives. We must be careful with those small actions we repeat every day.

A key aspect is the focus on the environment and its influence on our habits. Clear argues that optimising our environment can make adopting new habits and eliminating unwanted ones easier. Additionally, he highlights the importance of surrounding ourselves with people who help us achieve those desired habits.

Everything presented in the book sounds very interesting. The challenge lies in the correct application, as over the years, making changes becomes more challenging. Our brains and bodies will always seek the easiest route or what we have learned to be immediately rewarding. Therefore, it takes a lot of ❤️+🥚+🧠 to develop habits that make us feel more fulfilled.

Words I’m pondering:

  • The most effective way to change your habits is to focus not on what you want to achieve but on who you wish to become.
  • Your identity emerges out of your habits. Every action is a vote for the type of person you wish to become.
  • Awareness comes before desire.
  • Happiness is simply the absence of desire.
  • It is the idea of pleasure that we chase.
  • Peace occurs when you don’t turn your observations into problems.
  • With a big enough why you can overcome any how.
  • Being curious is better than smart.
  • Emotions drive behaviour.
  • We can only be rational and logical after we have been emotional.
  • Your response tends to follow your emotions.
  • Suffering drives progress.
  • Your actions reveal how badly you want something.
  • Reward is on the other side of sacrifice.
  • Self-control is difficult because it is not satisfying.
  • Our expectations determine our satisfaction.
  • Satisfaction = Liking – Wanting
  • The pain of failure correlates to the height of expectation.
  • Feelings come both before and after behaviour.
  • Desire initiates. Pleasure sustains.
  • Hope declines with experience and is replaced by acceptance.

Thank you for reading.

Have a great day! 😘

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